Documentary Film Matinee

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04/14/2018 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm America/Creston Timezone
Creston Public Library
531 16 Ave S
Creston, BC V0B 1G5

Each month the library offers a screening of some of the latest hard hitting or informative releases for viewing and discussion on a Saturday afternoon. Everyone is welcome, admittance is free, and there is no need to register.

Revolution: the documentary

Revolution is a feature documentary about opening your eyes, changing the world and fighting for something. A true life adventure following director Rob Stewart in the follow up to his smash hit Sharkwater, Revolution is an epic adventure into the evolution of life on earth and the revolution to save us.

Discovering that there’s more in jeopardy than sharks, Stewart uncovers a grave secret threatening our own survival as a species, and embarks on a life-threatening adventure through 4 years and 15 countries into the greatest battle ever waged.

Bringing you some of the most incredible wildlife spectacles ever recorded, audiences are brought face to face with sharks and cuddly lemurs, into the microscopic world of the pygmy seahorse, and on the hunt with the deadly flamboyant cuttlefish. From the coral reefs in Papua New Guinea to the rainforests in Madagascar, Stewart reveals that all of our actions are interconnected.

Through it all, Stewart’s journey of encouragement and hope meets activists and individuals all over the world that are winning the battle to save the ecosystems we depend on for survival.

Presenting the most important information on human survival and inspiring people all over the world to fight for life, Revolution is essential viewing for everyone. Startling, beautiful, and provocative, Revolution inspires audiences across the globe to start a revolution and change the world forever.

Revolution premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival and has already gone on to win numerous awards, including the Audience Award for Best Documentary at the Atlantic Film Festival, Most Popular Environmental Film Award at the Vancouver International Film Festival, the Audience Award at the Victoria Film Festival and the Social Justice Award at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

Rob Stewart was an award winning wildlife photographer, filmmaker, conservationist and educator. Born and raised in Toronto, Canada, Stewart began photographing underwater when he was 13. By the age of 18 he became a scuba instructor trainer and then moved on to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, studying in Ontario, Jamaica and Kenya.

Before making Sharkwater (2007), Stewart spent four years travelling the world as chief photographer for the Canadian Wildlife Federation’s magazines. Leading expeditions to the most remote areas of the world, Stewart’s highly sought after images have appeared in nearly every media form worldwide.

While on assignment to photograph sharks in the Galapagos Islands, Stewart discovered illegal longlining, killing sharks within the marine reserve. He tried promoting awareness through print media, but when the public didn’t respond, Stewart decided to make a film to bring people closer to sharks. At the age of 22 he left his photography career behind and embarked on a remarkable journey over four years and 12 countries, resulting in the epic Sharkwater. It has been hugely successful, premiering at the Toronto International Film Festival and winning a “Canada’s Top Ten” award.

Stewart’s second film Revolution brought the “evolution of life and the revolution to save us” to the public, was the highest grossing Canadian documentary in 2013, and has won 19 awards at film festival all around the world.

Stewart has written two award winning books – Sharkwater: An Odyssey to Save the Planet ,and Save the Humans.

In January of 2017 Rob Stewart died while filming Sharkwater Extinction at the Queen of Nassau wreck off the coast of Islamorada. Stewart, 37, was diving to 229 feet on his third dive of the day. Accompanying him was dive organizer Peter Sotis, they surfaced together with breathing difficulties and Stewart disappeared from the surface while the Pisces crew assisted Sotis. The Coast Guard found Stewart’s body three days later, 300 feet (91 m) from its last known location at the surface.

As with all of our documentaries: The views and statements expressed in this film are solely those of the film makers and the other contributors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Creston Public Library.

Run time 86 minutes. Discussion to follow.

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